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20121224
20121224
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million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet. we have about two million miles of pipe in this nation. if you're walking around in an urban area, you're probably stepping on a pipe. man: our grandparents paid for, and put in for the first time, these large distribution systems. woman: and in many cases, it's not been touched since. man: we're at a critical turning point. much of that infrastructure is wearing out. narrator: our water infrastructure is made up of complex, underground systems that function continuously. these 10 locations t
all medical conditions and medications. do not use if you have prostate or breast cancer. serious side effects could include increased risk of prostate cancer; worsening prostate symptoms; decreased sperm count; ankle, feet, or body swelling; enlarged or painful breasts; problems breathing while sleeping; and blood clots in the legs. common side effects include skin redness or irritation where applied, increased red blood cell count, headache, diarrhea, vomiting, and increase in psa. see your doctor, and for a 30-day free trial, go to axiron.com. captioned by closed captioning services, inc. >>> on fox files. >> i said nobody move, nobody will get hurt. >> it was a crime that rocked america. >> i started making a list of people and i finally set isled on frank sinatra, jr. >> in 1963, hollywood star his kidnapped son.o savee >> he was defeated for the first time. >> also on the battlefield and the home front. >> they are bred for work and kept for work. >> how does man's best friend become a superdog. >> the longer you are with a dog the more he wants to work for you. >> and see this a
] but these guys, the poignant testimonies you were telling us because we live in a society where here are front line first responders. these guys tell stories about intervening in petty crime. we had one of the buildings that was targeted by some people who had terroristic intents, and they're on the front lines with this. and yet we can only pay them $7 and change an hour. and they have no benefits, they have no retirement security. one guy was telling me he's worked for ten years, no health care. if he gets sick, he has to try to come to work and work through the sickness. and that's not the america that i think of. and so i'm really hoping this week just to finish the answer, the overly-long answer is to, um, really bring more attention to these problems. and right now, this session, congress is going to be debating cuts in the s.n.a.p. program. and in this time of austerity, we can't be dumb and cut things that ultimately provide long-term benefits that are really not -- entitlements, they're really investments in us and our society, and we should begin to prioritize these things federally
's a shortened trading session for christmas eve. u.s. equity markets will close at 1:00 p.m. eastern time. bond currency and commodity trading they're going to end early. in japan, indonesia, the philippines, they were all closed in europe. only the uk, french, dutch and spanish stock markets are open and they're going to be closing early. there are now only five trading sessions left in 2012. get your act together. stocks and bonds, solid gains so far this year. the dow has advanced 8% in total. the s&p 500 up almost 14%. the nasdaq has jumped 16%. it's been a good year. the end of the year also means we are just days away from the fiscal cliff, however, and that's the bad news. and looming tax hikes, spending cuts, all of that. both sides warning a very big deal becoming a bit more unlikely. >> and my one bit of advice to speaker boehner is this. you cannot pass a bill with just republicans. on a broad thing like this, you need both. and he has put himself with plan b and sort of an impossible position. he has to get these hard right goes to go along with him. and he and the president were go
the militia was a useful thing to have. they could have built the continental army with the existence of the militia and people that have been in the militia and more importantly the volunteers and others who knew how to use firearms, and that was the key. >> host: so people were using these on the frontier protecting the indians, native americans, hunting certainly, and then in the colony's some sense of responsibility for the common good. >> guest: right. the common law right to have the firearms came with a civic duty to use them when called upon. >> host: who was in charge of these? >> guest: local commanders, towns. later on became more broadbased, but as tensions and hostility is mounted between the british authorities and the colonists in approach to the revolutionary war, it was seen by many of the leaders of the time has an advantage that we americans knew how to use firearms. >> host: at this time was there organized law enforcement or was it this group of volunteers on was that all law enforcement? >> guest: depends on the size of the town but there were not armed policemen
of the year. we've got craig hodges with us of the hodges fund and our own rick santelli. another guest will join us shortly. nice to have you on the program. craig, kicking off with you, in terms of your small cap portfolio, any changes as we go into year end? what would be the best strategy? >> historically, if you are at work you can make some really good buys. you have the january effect, the tax loss selling going on all month. this year is an unusual year in that you have also not just tax loss selling but you have people taking gains on stocks that they've held for years that they're trying to take advantage of, the 15% capital gains rate. we've seen a lot of that. the point is there's been a lot more selling this december. i look for several stocks to bounce back in early january. >> you are on hold until you can see the whites of their ey in washington. right? i mean, you're waiting to see what happens with this fiscal cliff? >> i am. i tell you, i think that the christmas gift people are getting right now is to sell above 13,000. we were surprised we're not getting a deal. i'm
. "starting point" begins right now. >> and our "starting point," a u.s. contractor in kabul gunned down and killed this morning by a woman wearing an afghan police uniform. it happened inside kabul's police headquarters. the latest in a string of suspected green on blue attacks that are hitting morale and eroding trust in allies there. our pentagon correspond respondent barbara starr up early for us working her sources. joins us live from washington with more. >> good morning, alina. in the last few minutes, our nato sources are confirming privately that, indeed, it was an american citizen. a contractor shot and killed by a woman, an afghan woman in a police uniform inside kabul police headquarters. what is not known at this point or they are not saying, whether this woman was an afghan police officer or came into possession of the uniform, stole it. we have seen these kinds of incidents before. people have infiltrated in, may have taliban loyalties, may be other issues at work here. they have seen grudges in the past being enacted upon. so not a lot of detail yet. but this whole issue
of you for coming here this afternoon and thank the boston book festival for having us. don't they do a nice job? isn't this a terrific eventsome. >> yes. [applause] >> let's also thank the plymouth rock foundation for sponsoring this particular session and say that without their generosity, it would be hard to put on events like this that add to the cultural life that we all enjoy in this great city. so so thanks to them. [applause] and in a way that's what we're here to talk about this afternoon, the triumph of this city and all the cities, the triumph of the city, that's the title of harvard economics professor ed glaeser's book. it's about what's made cities around the world great, about the challenges that they have had to overcome and still face. we're going to talk about b that in a few minutes in the special context of this city with our panel, and we'll take questions from you as well later. but, first, to launch us off with a presentation, here's the author, professor ed glaeser. [applause] >> thank you. thank you, bob. and thank you all so much for being here. i'm so enormo
appreciate it very much. join us on wednesday. happy holidays. "squawk on the street" starts right now. >> can't wait to see what jason got us here. welcome to "squawk on the street" on this final trading day before christmas. i'm carl, with melissa lee, david faber at the nyse. the new york stock exchange and nasdaq closing at 1:00 p.m. eastern time. the futures, a little bit of weakness here which we'll talk about in a minute, after it comes after a pretty bad day on friday. the european markets closed for the christmas eve holidays. london, paris, spain have each completed shortened sessions in light of the christmas holiday as well. the friday sell-off, only five trading days are left in the year. is the market getting used to the idea that a fiscal cliff solution will not happen before year end? >> only a few hours remain to finish your christmas shopping. but some words of caution for toymakers. are tablets and apps ruining the season as kids get more accustomed to technology? >> microsoft windows 8 gets more bad press today, as "the new york times" said it is not leading to a bo
, but like a bird, really beautiful. i used to say, mom, why didn't you try to get a career as a singer? no, she said she was too shy. she couldn't do it. and i'm basically shy too, but that makes the difference. how do you succeed if you don't try? >> how did you feel when your mother died? did you feel that you had reconciled things with her? >> basically, yeah. little -- a short time before she died, i remember going to her house -- and she had alzheimer's. she didn't recognize me really. but i started to sing her a melody of something she had sung when she was younger, and that she remembered, and it just shoeds y shows you the power of music, doesn't it? >> what was it you sang? do you remember? >> it was something that she made a record of when i was 13 and she took me, but it was really because she made the records, and i was able to make a record when i was 13. >> do you think she was proud of you? >> you know what it was? i used to say, ma, how come you never told me i love you? you never said those words or really hugged me. she said, i didn't want you to get a swelled head. she s
at coldwell banker are filling us in on the details of what the ultra luxury buyer is looking for. >> hi, my name is chris cortazzo with coldwell banker, here in malibu, california, home to some of the most luxurious properties in the world, notwithstanding some of the best weather, as well. i am here today to talk about the luxury market report. it looks like the home buying of the ultra luxurious consumer. location is the number one criteria. however, there are some new trends which are occurring, which are exciting for our marketplace. so who is being ultra luxury consumer? 72% are local, many are entrepreneurs, 54% are married with children, 39% of international buyers are coming from asia, and 62% are between 45 to 52 years old. in greenwich, conn., and in california, most are married with children, but in miami, they are more likely to be high- net-worth entrepreneurs. the report also asks, what interests the ultra luxury consumer when it comes to real estate? it should be no surprise that 79% of the agents say it is location that is the most important aspect for the ultra luxury buyer
remarks that allowed as how the militia was a useful thing to have. he couldn't have bit the continental army without the existence of the militias and people who had been in the militias, and more importantly, volunteers and others who knew how to use firearms, and that was key. >> host: people were using these on the frontier, protection against the indians, native americans, hunting, and then in the colonies, some sense of responsibility nor the common good. >> guest: the command law right to have and use firearms came with a civic duty to use them when called upon. >> host: who was in charge of the militias? >> guest: local commanders, towns. they had them in new england, certainly. later on, they became more broadly based, but as tensions and hostilities mounted between the british authorities authorie colonists, in the approach to revolutionary war, it was seen by many of the leaders at the time as an advantage that we americans -- we knew how to use firearms. >> host: at this time was there organized law enforcement? these communities? or was in effect this group of volunteers or
to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny, that making any accommodation to shut it down, to do something to it, is very difficult. narrator: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovered rust on the tunnel's valves. there were concerns that if they closed the valves for tunnel inspections, they may never open again, leaving new york city without water. so they chose to keep them open. as a result, there has not been significant inspection, maintenance, or repair of the tunnels in decades. no one knows their current condition. hurwitz: currently, city tunnel 1 and city tunnel number 2 would be feeding each half of the city. so you'd lose half the city if you didn't have a replacement.
christmasy and that's good enough for us. hmm, we're not really sure. no one is. no, only a few more shocking days until christmas. we are toast if casper doesn't scare someone quick. but when it comes to scaring, casper sucks worse than fatso. too bad, we couldn't turn casper into a different ghost. or, turn a different ghost into casper like our nephew, spooky! he looks like his cousin casper. that little guy isn't a bad scarer either. hey, there's a picture of him right here in the ghost academy fear book. yeah, lose the hat and the freckle and you got a good casper. i mean, a bad casper! so, we've got a plan. we get him to come here and impersonate casper then.. snizzle sees him scare the stink out of someone, then.. we have to share our figgy pudding with him? we have to share our figgy...no! we get our haunting licenses back and avoid being left in... the dark. hey look! the fear book gives his number in new york city. i'll call him on my smellular phone. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ nice view, hey poyo! look at all them people way down there. they look like aunts. oh, spooky! i'm sure there's a
a solution. give us one, john. >> meanwhile, president obama is spending christmas in hawaii where he and the first lady attended the holiday memorial service for the late u.s. senator from daniel inouye. >> white house correspondent kristen welker. kristen, obviously they always say the white house travels with the president wherever he is. that's where the white house is. the president, though, is enjoying vacation, but still continuing to keep tabs on the fiscal cliff negotiations, correct? >> he is. white house officials describe this as a working vacation. i think there have been maybe a few conversations at the staff level about the fiscal cliff, but the reality is, thomas, the negotiations have largely stalled. you remember president obama on friday urging lawmakers to take this time off to really cool off, come back later this week with a appreciate perspective. i think you're going to see the hard work, the real negotiations resume when lawmakers go back into session after the christmas holiday. now, last week it seemed as though president obama, house speaker john boehner we
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15